Thursday, 27 February 2014

Fantastic Voyage: Influence Map and Style







I've always been interested in the art style of the three brothers, I love the way that it is a silhouette animation but but with a three dimension to it. Also the fact that it is not black and white gives you a chance to experiment with different colours in the background in comparison to the silhouettes.

In comparison I like the art direction in Journey with its saturated colours, therefore I may find a good mix between both of these for my animation about the slime molds Journey. 

Wednesday, 26 February 2014

Fantastic Voyage: Influence Maps




Influence maps for the slime mold, I'm unsure about the target audience as of yet and the art direction that I plan to go in. But I was thinking maybe aiming it towards the older audience and going with a silhouette style of animation similar to Tom Beg's mushroom animation.

The Story I was thinking following an Amoebid cell and turning into a Zygote who has to travel through different landscapes to find its other Zygotes in a Feeding Plasmodium which will then transform into a young sporangium which will then continue over as a cycle. My main focus I want to focus on is the environments the Zygote travels through to find the Plasmodium as the being the 'end goal' or achievement.

Fantastic Voyage: Plasmodial Slime

Plasmodial  Slime 
Supporting Research: 





For the Fantastic Voyage project I am going to chose to work on the Plasmodial  Slime as it appealed to me the most after seeing the last year's examples. I'm not sure on the style of work that I want to go for yet although I do want to keep it stylized and visually interesting for the audience.

Film Review: Jaws (1975)

Fig 1
Steven Spielberg's 1975 Jaws is based upon Peter Benchley's best selling novel of which has the same name. It is a classic man vs nature film with the big man eating shark being the nature object. Similarly to Psycho, Jaws consists of little music throughout and is still renowned for one of the most famous sounds in film history with the strings its instantly recognizable and as an audience we associate that sound of the strings with fear, suspense and ultimately - Jaws. From the very begging we are filled with dramatic music and this is said by B. H. Martin in his Jaws review, ''Jaws begins in the darkness of the deep ocean. Before we see anything, our ears are chilled by composer John Williams' menacing two note soundtrack which then builds into that unforgettable frenzy as the unseen shark savages its first victim.'' (Martin, 2012). With the menacing sound track creating tension the audience knows what is about the happen when the shark is approaching (Fig 2.), but is it is done in such a way that you can feel it through the music before the action has happened in front of you.


Fig 2.


Gene Siskel says in his review of Jaws that the characters are not important within the film as that is not the focus of the film when it was being made, he says: ''So far I've managed to avoid describing the story or any of the humans involved in it. That's because what this movie is about, and where it succeeds best, is the primordial level of fear.'' (Siskel, 1999). What Siskel seems to be saying is that the characters do not play an important role within the film but rather the whole film evolves around its soundtrack and the fear it creates within the audience. When looking at Jaws  the none suspense shots and the overall character building is weak in comparison to music composition and anticipation shots, this is where Jaws really shines and why it is well known for its tension caused throughout the film.
http://flavorwire.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/june2011finalimagejaws.jpg?w=600&h=335
Fig 3.
During the film the shark was see to be represented by floating objects or camera angles that make the audience believe that they are viewing from the sharks perspective (Fig 3.). This was explained in Rodger Ebert film review of Jaws, ''Floating objects are used all through the movie to suggest the invisible shark.'' (Ebert, 2000) this was mainly due to the technical difficulties they had with the shark operating on set because of the difficulties that they encountered this was more of a reason to have a recognizable sound that you can associate with the shark so the audience knows what to expect when hearing the dreading violins and orchestra in the background. With the soundtrack being one of the most notorious sounds that you will hear throughout the film industry. Although this film is not the best at character development the use of sounds and the suspense caused throughout is to be desired in the film industry.

Illustration List:

Fig 1. [Film Poster] Jaws (1975), Directed by Steven Spielberg. 
At: http://www.blog.sharkcagediving.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/jaws-movie-poster.jpg (Accessed on 25.02.2014)


Fig 2. [Film Still] Jaws (1975) Directed by Steven Spielberg.
At: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNmYEg3aLds#t=44 (Accessed on 25.02.2014)

Fig 3. [Film Still] Jaws (1975) Directed by Steven Spielberg.
At: http://flavorwire.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/june2011finalimagejaws.jpg?w=600&h=335 (Accessed on 26.02.2014)

Bibliography:

Martin, B. (2012) Jaws is Back - Review

At: http://www.u.tv/blogs/B-H-Martin/Shark-Attack-Jaws-Is-Back/01dadc82-fc82-49f0-bbd6-88f09371c29d (Accessed on 25.02.2014)

Siskel, G. (1999) Jaws Movie Review
At: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1999-10-15/entertainment/9910200025_1_movie-reviews-star-film/2 (Accessed on 26.02.2014)

Ebert, R. (2000) Jaws (1975) Film Review
At: http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-jaws-1975 (Accessed on 26.02.2014)

Life Drawing: 26.02.2014







Tuesday, 25 February 2014

Film Review: Pyscho (1960)

poster, 1960
Fig 1.
Psycho directed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1960 is a story that was hugely inspired by a serial killer in 50's - Edward Theodore Gein. Psycho was not a high budget film and was deliberately shot to make it look like a cheap exploration film to help build the tension and suspense for the audience. To keep the price low Hitchcock chose to shoot the film in black and white even though colour was available with in combination working with one layer of sound throughout the film. Its unique violin screech in the shower scene makes an unique viewing experience that leaves the audience with a memory of Psycho. Rodger Ebert talks about Hitchcock's directing decisions when creating the shower scene, ''Seeing the shower scene today, several things stand out. Unlike modern horror films, "Psycho" never shows the knife striking flesh. There are no wounds. There is blood, but not gallons of it.'' (Ebert, 1998). Hitchcock did not believe in showing gore but using suspense and the notorious sound  of screeching violins to represent the crime in the shower (Fig 2).


Fig 2.
 The use of screeching violins is not only reflected in the shower scene but the notion of tearing resonates throughout the whole film too. The long screeches and winding chords reflect the suspense and madness that the audience is going to witness throughout the film this is said by Rob Nixon,“Herrmann wrote the main title theme for Psycho before Saul Bass created the opening credit sequence. Bass animated it to the music, creating the stabbing, wrenching look in which the credits are ripped in half.” (Nixon, 2014). Throughout the film Hitchcock is always referring back to the notion of discomfort for the audience and this is even shown through the credits of the film too reminding you of the shower scene murder with the grey lines representing the shower curtain and the words 'psycho' seemingly being sliced in half.(Fig 3.).

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-pq6FFdtJUWw/UQWOKsnDy0I/AAAAAAAAAgM/Ml6mfogAifI/s1600/Psycho_Saul+Bass.jpg
Fig 3
 Bernard Herrmann was the music music composer for the Psycho he did not only follow each scene beat for beat he found a way to convey the emotions of the characters through the music within the film, Chris McEneany goes into some detail about the sounds within Psycho he states, ''His music told the same story but from an instinctual standpoint that served to join the dots and fill in the blanks - although in much too subtle and intelligent a manner than to merely blurt out the details.'' (McEneany, 2010). It appears that what McEneany is saying is that Psycho is told in two separate stories one from a visual standpoint and one from a musical view. Psycho is a classic film where music and visuals harmonies into a perfect viewing experience leaving you feeling unsettled with a killer performance.



Illustration List: 

Fig 1. Psycho [Film poster], Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. At: http://johneaves.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/psycho-theatrical-release-poster-1960.jpg (Accessed on 24.02.2014)

Fig 2.  [Film still], Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. At: http://fogsmoviereviews.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/pyscho4752.jpg (Accessed on 25.02.2014)

Fig 3.  [Film still], Directed by Alfred Hitchcock.At: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-pq6FFdtJUWw/UQWOKsnDy0I/AAAAAAAAAgM/Ml6mfogAifI/s1600/Psycho_Saul+Bass.jpg (Accessed on 25.02.2014)


Bibliography:

Ebert, R. 1998. Psycho Review. 
http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-psycho-1960 (Accessed on 25.02.2014)

Nixon, R. (2014) Behind the camera on Psycho.
At: http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/191164|0/Behind-the-Camera-Psycho.html (Accessed on 25.02.2014)

McEneany, C. 2010. Psycho - Complete Original Motion Picture Score Soundtrack Review.
At: http://www.avforums.com/review/psycho-complete-original-motion-picture-score-soundtrack-review.1476 (Accessed on 25.02.2014)




Monday, 24 February 2014

Illustrator: 24.02.2014



Film Review: Rope (1948)

Fig 1



Rope is a classic thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1948. The film does not consist of any editing that you would see in modern films and the acting is naturalistic which leads the audience to believe that what they are seeing is in real time. That is not to say that there is not editing within Rope, there is, just not as much editing you would see other films that rely on editing to get the narrative across. It is directed in a way which you would consider it to be a continuous film and it was filmed in this way to represent the qualities of theater on a screen production.  It was a challenge for the director to get across the quality of a theater production on play screen and this was said in the New York Times by Vincent Canby, ''Hitchcock was interested in seeing whether he could find a cinematic equivalent to the play, which takes place in the actual length of time of the story'' (Canby, 1984). The breaks that usually occur within Rope  are done by panning across someone's back to a dark frame where he would cut the film and replace it with another. The result of a film that doesn't use the use of conventional montage by cutting from one frame to another gave the film an unusual, eerie feel to it, which is suited to the overall film.

Rope is an 80 minute film that is made out to be longer with its theater qualities to it, the set was built with this in mind Arbunkle explains the use of set design in his review, “In Rope, (Hitchcock) used a set with walls built on wheels so that he could have the cameras move unimpeded around the film’s group of three rooms.” (Arbunkle, 1999). This helps Hitchcock keep the sense of a continuous film coupled with realistic New York city backgrounds and you have a setting that is convincing of being in real time (Fig. 2). 


Fig 2.
The long takes that give the film a sense of continuation also can give a sense of suspense as Fernando F. Croce states, '' Far from just "recording a play," the suffocating long takes enforce ethical contemplation by refusing the relief of a cut '' (Croce, 2006) this is shown in the scene with the maid when she is preparing the coffee table with the body inside (Fig 3.) 
With the use of a contiguous shot and one point perspective the audience is led to focus on the situation that is about to happen. An example of this is when the maid and Rupert are staring at the box with Dave inside creating a sense of tension and suspense. Hitchcock uses a technique where the audience has more information than the characters, within Rope the audience know about the body inside the box where the characters are completely oblivious to the situation. 



Fig 3.





Illustration List:


Fig 3. Rope [Film Still], From Rope - Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock. At:http://1.bp.blogspot.com/---HFon773OU/TzArHuPkfpI/AAAAAAAAAls/OwXgBnpl3bE/s1600/Rope+tense+chest+scene.jpg (Accessed on 24.02.2014)


Fig 2. Rope From Rope - Directed by: Alfred Hitchcock
http://i2.wp.com/www.filmophilia.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/4711.jpg (Accessed on 24.02.2014)

Fig 1. Rope Poster(1948) From: Rope – Directed By: Alfred Hitchcock.
At: http://derekwinnert.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/679.jpg (Accessed on 21.01.2014)

Bibliography:
Canby, V. 1984, Rope - Film Review: [online]
At:  http://www.nytimes.com/library/film/060384hitch-rope-reflection.html (Accessed on 21.01.2014)

Arbunkle, W. (1999) Hitchcock's Film Interiors: Home Is Where The Knife Is
http://www.thewag.net/film/hitch.htm (Accessed on 24.012014)

Croce, F. 2006, Rope - Film Review: [Online]
At: http://www.slantmagazine.com/dvd/review/rope/948 (Accessed on 24.02.2014)




Friday, 21 February 2014

Script to Screen: 3D Scenes




Script to Screen: Crit Presentation







Script to Screen: Final Animatic with sounds

Script to Screen: Art of... ''The Lonely Performer''

Script to Screen: Theater Concept Art


I tried to keep this piece loose in comparison to the other paintings, trying to capture the overall feel of the theater whilst keeping the traditional look to it.

Script to Screen: Script Updated

Unit 3: Storytelling and Commission - Script
The Lonely Performer
Written by 
Anthony Faulkner
Ext. Venice Scene 1, Early Afternoon. 
  
   PAN UP. Canal boat passes by the camera, to reveal Venice. 
   CAMERA ZOOMS OUT. 
   WIDE SHOT. Showing the Venice exterior with the clothes on the lines and the plants hanging from the buildings.
   CAMERA PANS UP. to reveal a poster on a wall about Anzolo the magician in the venetian theater.
   FADE OUT TO WHITE.
INT. Scene 2, Venetian theater.
   FADE BACK IN.
   WIDE SHOT. Showing the interior of the venetian theater, with Anzolo walking onto the stage.
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. Anzolo getting ready to perform, deep breathes and looks into the audience. 
   
CUTS TO:
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. Lonely guy's face in the audience having a stern expression.
   
CUTS TO:
   MID SHOT. Anzolo pulls out a pack of cards and shuffles them.
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. Shuffling to then picking one card out of the pack.
   MID SHOT. To reveal the card.
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. of the card Nine of Hearts.
   CAMERA ZOOMS OUT. as Anzolo is shuffling the cards.
   MID SHOT. he picks out the nine of hearts to show that its the right card.
  CAMERA ZOOMS OUT to behind the single audience member (Over the shoulder shot) you hear the person sigh of boredom.

CUTS TO:
    CLOSE UP. Anzolo turns around thinking of what to do next then he gets an idea and turns around all happy and ready to perform another trick. 
     
TRANSITIONS:
   FADES IN: Anzolo holding a trombone and a magic cloth.

CUTS TO: The lonely audience member holding a a clip board in front of his face (as if he is marking him) and slaps it into his face wanting it to be over.
 CUTS TO:  Behind Anzolo on the stage
   MID SHOT. Anzolo puts the trombone on the floor and covers it with his cloth, he starts to wave his hands and magic comes from them onto the cloth.
  MID SHOT. Showing the magic around the cloth. 
CUTS TO:  
   CLOSE UP. of the single audience member as he leans in his seat in surprise and smiles at the musician.
   CLOSE UP. Archy looking annoyed
   CAMERA PANS DOWN. to his clenched fists, he then waves his hands creating magic lighting going towards the trombone player.
   CAMERA PANS. with the lighting streak at the feet of the player. trombone music still in the back ground.
   MID SHOT. puff of smoke. trombone music stops.
   WIDE SHOT. to see lots of puffs of smoke on the screen and the noise gradually increases with trombone playing.
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. Anzolo's face getting really angry
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. End of trombone comes into the shot teasing Anzolo. He shouts as the trombone darts off.
   CAMERA ZOOMS OUT. to reveal Anzolo ripping his shirt and doves flying out of his chest towards the camera.
   FADES TO WHITE
  
INT. Scene 3, Mental Asylum Attic, Late Afternoon.
   MID SHOT. of Anzolo sweating and exhausted with a ripped shirt on, taking an exhausted bow. 
CUTS TO:
   CLOSE UP. Doctor looking impassive, he then looks down. 
   CAMERA PANS DOWN. reveals his clip board where we see Anzolo's name on it, he then puts a red cross through it and gets up off his chair.
   MID SHOT. (Camera by the chair with Anzolo on a little wooden stage in the attic covered in white protection). Anzolo looks down towards the ground looking like he has no hope. Footsteps walking away with the doctor getting closer to the camera.
 TRANSITIONS TO BLACK
 CUTS TO:
   CLOSE UP. Door opening with the doctor walking through and closes the door as we see Anzolo through the bars. 
(When the door closes) THUD. CUTS TO BLACK. 
FIN.   

Script to Screen: Animatic (No sound)

Script to Screen: Production Art Prop and Orthographics





Wednesday, 19 February 2014

Script to Screen: Scene 1 Storyboard


Script to Screen: Doctor Character


Script to Screen: Script

Unit 3: Storytelling and Commission - Script
The Lonely Performer
Written by 
Anthony Faulkner

Ext. Venice Scene 1, Early Afternoon. 
   CLOSE UP. Showing the sky reflected in the water.
   PAN UP. Canal boat passes by the camera, to reveal Venice. 
   CAMERA ZOOMS OUT. 
   WIDE SHOT. Showing the Venice exterior with the clothes on the lines and the plants hanging from the buildings, we see children running over the bridge.
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. Legs running over the bridge, children laughing.
   CAMERA PANS UP. to reveal a poster on a wall about Anzolo the magician in the venetian theater.
   FADE OUT TO WHITE.

INT. Scene 2, Venetian theater.
   FADE BACK IN.
   WIDE SHOT. Showing the interior of the venetian theater, with Anzolo walking onto the stage.
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. Anzolo getting ready to perform, deep breathes and looks into the audience. 
   
CUTS TO:
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. Lonely guy's face in the audience having a stern expression.
   
CUTS TO:
   MID SHOT. Anzolo pulls out a pack of cards and shuffles them.
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. Shuffling to then picking one card out of the pack.
   MID SHOT. To reveal the card.
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. of the card Nine of Hearts.
   CAMERA ZOOMS OUT. as Anzolo is shuffling the cards.
   MID SHOT. he picks out the nine of hearts to show that its the right card.
  CAMERA ZOOMS OUT to behind the single audience member (Over the shoulder shot) as Anzolo bows to him you hear the person sigh of boredom.

CUTS TO:
    CLOSE UP. Anzolo turns around thinking of what to do next then he gets an idea and turns around all happy and ready to perform another trick. 
    CLOSE UP. Anzolo reveals the card again but this time throws it into the air.
(As he throws the card up)
 
CUTS TO:
    MID SHOT PAN (right to left). the card thrown up in the air and zaps it at the highest point to reveal that it has turned into a trombone.
   (As the trombone is falling) MID SHOT PAN (Left to Middle). Anzolo catches the trombone.

CUTS TO: behind the single audience member (Over the shoulder shot) he makes a thinking sound as intrigued to what is going to happen.
  CAMERA ZOOMS IN. MID SHOT. Anzolo puts the trombone on the floor and covers it with his cloth, he starts to wave his hands and magic comes from them onto the cloth.
  LONG SHOT. Showing the magic around the cloth. 
  CLOSE UP. Anzolo releases the cloth to reveal another character playing the trombone.

CUTS TO:  
   CLOSE UP. of the single audience member as he leans in his seat in surprise and smiles at the musician.
   CLOSE UP. Archy looking annoyed
   CAMERA PANS DOWN. to his clenched fists, he then waves his hands creating magic lighting going towards the trombone player.
   CAMERA PANS. with the lighting streak at the feet of the player. trombone music still in the back ground.
   MID SHOT. puff of smoke. trombone music stops.
   CLOSE UP. Anzolo face looks happy as it goes silent.
   CLOSE UP. Anzolo goes to perform again but is interrupted by the trombone and now a juggler.
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. juggling and trombone.
   WIDE SHOT. to see lots of puffs of smoke on the screen and the noise gradually increases with circus acts. 
   EXTREME CLOSE UP. Anzolo's face getting really angry
   CAMERA ZOOMS OUT. to reveal Anzolo ripping his shirt and doves flying out of his chest towards the camera.
   FADES TO WHITE
  
INT. Scene 3, Mental Asylum Attic, Late Afternoon.

   MID SHOT. of Anzolo sweating and exhausted with a ripped shirt on, taking an exhausted bow. 

CUTS TO:
   CLOSE UP. Doctor looking impassive, he then looks down. 
   CAMERA PANS DOWN. reveals his clip board where we see Anzolo's name on it, he then puts a red cross through it and gets up off his chair.
   MID SHOT. (Camera by the chair with Anzolo on a little wooden stage in the attic covered in white protection). Anzolo looks down towards the ground looking like he has no hope. Footsteps walking away.

CUTS TO:
   CLOSE UP. (Over the shoulder shot) of behind Anzolo looking at the ground as the doctor walks away. Doctor opens the door.

 CUTS TO:
   CLOSE UP. Door opening with the doctor walking through and closes the door as we see Anzolo through the bars. 

(When the door closes) THUD. CUTS TO BLACK. 

FIN.   


    
   
  
  
   

  

Script to Screen: Further Research

Heart of the Cards Meanings:
 

These only apply for the heart variation of the cards and when deciding on what card he shall pick out in his performance I am going to choose the Nine of Hearts as it symbolises that maybe his dreams of becoming a performer will come true.

Other Meanings can be found here: http://www.serenapowers.com/playingcards2.html (Accessed on 19.02.2014)

Ace: The home, love, friendship, joy the start of a romance. A love letter.
Two: Success and prosperity. An engagement or partnership.
Three: You need to be cautious. Don't say something you'll regret.
Four: A change, a journey or a move of house/business. A late marriage.
Five: Jealous people around you. Take your time to make any decisions.

Six: Unexpected good luck. Someone helping you out.
Seven: An unfaithful or unreliable person. Broken promises.
Eight: Visits and visitors. Invitations out or attending a party.
Nine: The wish card. Dreams come true.
Ten: Good luck and happiness.
Jack: A close friend or a good-natured, fair-haired youth.
Queen: A kindly fair-haired woman.
King: A good-natured, fair-haired man. Good advice.

Script to Screen: Premise, Logline and Step Outline Updated

Premise:








>Would being in Isolation drive you insane?

Logline:
 

>Anzolo
A magician that is put in isolation because he is seen to be ‘crazy’. He wants to be a performer but he is in a constant battle with himself. Half of him wants to be a musician as a talented trombone player and the other a magician. Will he ever overcome his problems to be given the chance to perform in front of a real crowd? 
 
Step Outline:
>Opening shot of the blue sky in Venice when a leaf floats by the camera.
>Pans down following a leaf from the balcony when it hits the water of the canals.
>Canal boat rides over the leaf, camera pans up to follow the canal boat and then the camera zooms out as the canal boat goes down the canals and under the bridge.>Establishing shot of Venice lit brightly, very saturated colour, children laughing and washing on the lines over head with the sound of birds in the background.
> Camera cuts to children running over a bridge (close up of legs) as a leaflet flies by showing the magician show advertised. 
>Cuts to the Venetian theater where Anzolo (Magician) is on walking on stage - (Long shot)
>Close up of Anzolo's face getting ready to perform - Deep breathes.
>Cuts to show a single man in the audience with a clip board ready to mark his performance. 
> Anzolo Pulls out a pack of cards to shuffle to them and to reveal one card to the audience, shuffles them again and pulls out the one card everyone saw.
> He then throws the card into the air (Camera follows the card) 
>Zaps it with magic and it turns into a trombone
>Points his wand to the sky and spells Anzolo in a blue smoke.
>Cuts to Anzolo's Face with a grin, looks exhausted and nervous sweat running down him
>Cuts to the lone guy in the audience who doesn't look amused. 
>Anzolo looks like his is thinking of what to do, puts the trombone on the ground and reveals a cloth and places over the cards, waves his hands and reveals a person playing the trombone.
>Anzolo looks shocked as to what has happened.
>Guy in the audience leans forward in his seat as the trombone player plays.
>Anzolo looks angry and frustrated so starts to try and zap the trombone player but with each zap creates a different person, one a juggler, one a clown, and other circus performers. 
>Cuts to Anzolo's face in anger and frustration to reveal his final trick. 
> Cuts the guy in the audience who looks curious in what he is doing. 
>He then rips his shirt to reveal doves flying towards to camera until the screen turns white. 
>Cuts the asylum room zooming out of the white padded walls.
>Cuts to Anzolo sweating and ripped clothes and exhausted, giving a little bow. 
>Cuts to a doctor that is sitting there in a chair looking with an impassive reaction on his face. 
>Close up of the check board with Anzolo's name on it, puts a red cross. 
>Gets up and walks out the room with Anzolo in the background on a little wooden stage in an attic of an asylum (Camera following the doctor)
>until we reach a door, the doctor opens the door and close it.
>We then have the last shot of behind the closed bars door. 
> As the Thud happens of the door closes the screen turns black.
>Fin.